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Endoscopy: Introduction, Risk, Uses & Type

Endoscopy is the insertion of a long, thin tube directly into the body to observe an internal organ or tissue in detail. It can also be used to carry out other tasks including imaging and minor surgery.

A surgeon inserts an endoscope through a small cut, or an opening in the body such as the mouth. An endoscope is a flexible tube with an attached camera that allows the doctor to observe and can use forceps (tongs) and scissors on the endoscope to operate or remove tissue for biopsy.

There are the different type of endoscope. The length and flexibility of endoscope is totally depend on body parts.

When do we need an Endoscope?

An endoscopy to visually examine an organ. An endoscope’s lighted camera allows the doctor to view potential problems without a large incision.

Investigation: if a patient is experiencing vomiting, abdominal pain, breathing disorders, stomach ulcers, difficulty swallowing or gastrointestinal bleeding, an endoscope can be utilized in the search for a cause

Confirmation: endoscopy can be used to complete biopsies (removal of a small section of tissue) to confirm a diagnosis of cancer or other diseases

Treatment: an endoscope can be used to treat an illness directly; for instance, endoscopy can be used to cauterised a bleeding vessel or remove a polyp.

Part of an Endoscopes

An endoscope consists of the following components:

Risk

Endoscopy has a much lower risk of bleeding and infection than open surgery. Still, endoscopy is a medical procedure and other rare complications such as:

If any of the following symptoms occur following an endoscopy indicates something went wrong;

  • Dark colored stool
  • Shortness of breath
  • Severe and persistent abdominal pain
  • Chest pain
  • Vomiting blood

Types

Arthroscopy

Bronchoscopy

Colonoscopy

Colposcopy

Cystoscopy

Enteroscopy

Esophagoscopy

Hysteroscopy

Gastroscopy

Laparoscopy

Laryngoscopy

Mediastinoscopy

Neuroendoscopy

Proctoscopy

Sigmoidoscopy

Thoracoscopy

Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

Ureteroscopy

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